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Posts for category: Dermatology

By Dermatology Of Lexington
July 30, 2018
Category: Dermatology
Tags: Canker Sore  

Canker sores appear within the mouthFind out everything you need to know about canker sore causes and treatments.

Canker sores are small painful ulcers that appear in the mouth. You may find that your canker sore makes it difficult to eat or talk without experiencing pain. If you are experiencing sores in the mouth that you think could be canker sores, find out what might be causing this pesky little problem and what you can do to reduce your symptoms and eliminate this mouth ulcer.

Canker Sore Causes

Unfortunately experts are unsure about what causes canker sores; however, it’s been speculated that either stress or injury to the oral tissues can bring about canker sores. Some canker sores may be brought about by other health disorders that weaken the immune system.

It’s important to note that canker sores and cold sores are not the same thing. A virus known as herpes simplex type 1 causes cold sores, and these sores occur outside the mouth. Canker sores, on the other hand, can be brought on by multiple factors, and appear only inside the mouth.

Canker Sore Symptoms

The most obvious symptom is a painful sore or ulcer that appears in the mouth, whether on the tongue, the roof of the mouth or inside of the cheeks. You may also notice a burning or tingling sensation a couple days before the sore manifests. The sore is usually round or oval in nature, with a red border and a white, grey or yellow center.

Canker Sore Treatments

The majority of canker sores will go away on their own without any kind of treatment; however, if you experience pain for more than a few days you may want to talk to your dermatologist about a corticosteroid cream or prescription medication that could help alleviate your symptoms.

If you suspect that you have a canker sore talk to your dermatologist about the most effective defense against canker sores and whether there are certain things you can do to prevent this condition from recurring. Call us today!

By Dermatology Of Lexington
July 03, 2018
Category: Dermatology
Tags: Cold sores  

Cold Sores can appear on the outside of the lipWhat are cold sores and what can you do to relieve your symptoms?

Most people who have had cold sores often know when they are about to appear. The tingling and burning sensation around the mouth is often the first indicator that a cold sore is imminent. Approximately 80 to 90 percent of Americans have been exposed to the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV­1), which causes cold sores. If you have cold sores then you are probably wondering more about this condition, how to treat it and what it means for your health.

What are the symptoms of cold sores?

Symptoms often stick around for about two to three weeks. Besides experiencing oral sores around the mouth, people may also experience flu­like symptoms such as fever, muscle aches and fatigue. These oral sores will often appear as tiny blisters that break open and scab over.

When should I see a doctor about cold sores?

While cold sores often don’t warrant a trip to the dermatologist, there are certain times when it might be advisable. These sores can be painful, so if you find it difficult to eat or talk then you will want to talk to your doctor about the best ways to alleviate the pain to make eating easier. The last thing you want to deal with is dehydration on top of an outbreak.

If these oral sores look different from other cold sore outbreaks, then it’s also worth seeing your dermatologist to receive a proper diagnosis. Those with weakened immune systems due to chronic illness or chemotherapy should also see their dermatologist to prevent further complications.

What treatments are available for cold sores?

While many cold sores will go away without the need for treatment, if you are experiencing pain we may prescribe a topical anesthetic to reduce your discomfort. There are also over­the-counter treatments that speed up healing and reduce pain. However, for those with severe infections your dermatologist may also prescribe an oral antiviral medication.

Those with weak immune systems and those who become dehydrated as a result of cold sores may need to go to the hospital to prevent further problems and to receive oral antivirals.

While you cannot cure the virus that causes cold sores, there are certainly ways to reduce your symptoms. Talk to your dermatologist to find out more!

By Dermatology Of Lexington
November 01, 2017
Category: Dermatology
Tags: Warts  

Warts are benign skin growths that appear when a virus infects the top layer of the skin. They often appear as a small, unsightly, rough Wart Removalgrowth on a person’s hands or feet, but can also appear on other parts of the body. There are many types of warts, some appearing flat or raised, and others growing in large clusters.

The virus that causes most warts is called human papillomavirus (HPV). Warts are usually harmless, but some strains of HPV are associated with other health complications. Wart viruses are contagious and can spread by direct contact, usually entering the body in an area of broken skin.

When should you see your dermatologist?

In some cases, a wart will disappear on its own, although it may take months or even years. Most people prefer some method of wart removal since warts are often unattractive, bothersome and even painful. In many cases, warts can be treated at home.

Common methods for self-treatment include covering the wart with duct tape or applying salicylic acid. It’s always best to consult your dermatologist before trying any at-home remedies. Wart removal by a trained dermatologist is always the most effective treatment.

The American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) recommends visiting your dermatologist if you have any of the following:

  • Any doubt that the skin growth is a wart, as some skin cancers resemble warts
  • A wart that appears on your face or genitals
  • Several warts
  • A wart that is painful, itchy, burns or bleeds
  • A weak immune system
  • Diabetes

Because HPV is contagious, you’ll want to take a few extra precautions to keep it from spreading, including:

  • Avoid scratching or picking your warts.
  • Always wear shoes in public places such as showers, locker rooms or pools.
  • Never touch another person’s wart.
  • Keep warts on the feet dry to prevent moisture from spreading the virus.

If your warts persist, are painful or if you have several warts, you should visit your dermatologist. There are many treatment options available for warts, including laser treatment or freezing, burning or cutting out the wart, among others. Your dermatologist can help you determine the best treatment option for your specific type of wart.

Since there is no permanent cure for HPV, warts can redevelop. In this case, its best to have your dermatologist treat the new wart as soon as it appears. Warts are a common and frustrating condition affecting both children and adults. Contact our office today and learn how you can wipe out your warts!

By Dermatology Of Lexington
March 16, 2017
Category: Dermatology
Tags: Psoriasis  

PsoriasisPsoriasis is a common, chronic and often frustrating skin condition that causes skin scaling, inflammation, redness and irritation. The exact cause is unknown, but psoriasis is thought to be caused by an overactive immune system, which causes the skin to form inflamed, scaly lesions. These patches of thick, red skin may be itchy and painful. They are often found on the elbows and knees, but can also form on the scalp, lower back, face and nails.

Symptoms of psoriasis are different for every person and can vary in intensity over time. Some people may even go months or years without symptoms before flare-ups return. Symptoms of psoriasis can manifest in many ways, including:

  • Rough, scaly skin
  • Cracks on fingertips
  • Simple tasks are painful, such as tying your shoe
  • Brown, uneven nails
  • Flaky skin
  • Joint pain or aching
  • Severe itching

The onset of psoriasis can occur at any age, although it most often occurs in adults. The disease is non-contagious and is thought to be genetic. Because psoriasis is a persistent, systemic autoimmune disease, people with psoriasis will have it for a lifetime. Most people who suffer from psoriasis can still lead healthy, active lives with proper management and care. 

Coping with Psoriasis: Your Dermatologist can Help

Currently, there is no cure for psoriasis, but with the help of your dermatologist, you can learn how to cope with the condition, reduce psoriasis symptoms and keep outbreaks under control for an improved quality of life. Treatment depends on how serious the psoriasis is, the type of psoriasis and how the patient responds to certain treatments.

By Dermatology Of Lexington
February 14, 2017
Category: Dermatology
Tags: Eczema  

EczemaEczema, also called “dermatitis,” refers to several different rash-like conditions where the skin is inflamed, red and irritated. The most severe and long-lasting type of eczema is atopic dermatitis. During a flare-up, the skin becomes extremely red, itchy and scaly. This skin condition can be widespread, or confined to only a few areas on the body.

Eczema is not contagious, although if you have a family history of eczema, your risk for the disease increases. Generally, atopic dermatitis affects infants or young children and may last until the child reaches adulthood.

The appearance and symptoms for atopic dermatitis will vary for each case. Intense itching is the most common sign of eczema, which can lead to severe discomfort and even loss of sleep. Other common symptoms of eczema include:

  • Dry, red and extremely itchy patches of skin
  • Cracked, inflamed and scaly skin
  • Small bumps or blisters that ooze and weep
  • In infants, the rash generally appears on the cheeks and around the mouth

Eczema outbreaks are caused by an overreaction of your skin’s immune system to environmental and emotional triggers, such as temperature, chemicals, dust, mold or stress. While there is currently no cure, eczema sufferers can practice self-care at home to help reduce flare-ups. Lifestyle adjustments are the best line of defense in controlling all types of eczema. Goals of treatment include reducing inflammation, decreasing risk of infection and alleviating the itch. To minimize symptoms and outbreaks:

  • Moisturize every day to prevent dryness and cracking.
  • Limit contact with irritants, such as soaps, clothing, jewelry, foods and detergents.
  • Avoid sudden changes in temperatures as overheating and sweating are common triggers of flare-ups.
  • Reduce stress and anxiety.
  • Minimize exposure to mold, pollens and animal dander.
  • Opt for cotton, loose-fitting clothes and avoid wool and other rough materials.

Treatment for eczema begins with a proper diagnosis from your dermatologist. If you are diagnosed with eczema, your dermatologist can explain your type of eczema and can work with you to tailor a treatment plan that meets your individual needs to effectively manage the symptoms.